Monday, September 16, 2019
Sharp-Journal > Editorial > Bring Back Our Corruption Or Bring Back Our Girls?

Bring Back Our Corruption Or Bring Back Our Girls?

Goodluck Jonathan, Corruption

Have you noticed the new show of shame by a subset of Nigerians tagged “Bring Back Our Corruption?” So, I asked, which corruption? Have you not suffered enough from the corruption of the previous administration? And they say: they are contented. They prefer the corruption of that time to the change mantra that has brought hardship to them. Is this the new line of thinking? Are the youths of this country suddenly bereft of common sense and shrewdness? Are they naïve of what transpired during the last administration?

The nexus of this reflection is that, corruption is now accepted by Nigerians as a recognized norm in their day to day life. It is disheartening that this display of hypocrisy is very popular among the youth, especially, on social media. They are the front-runner of this pathetic form of distraction.

Bring Back Our Girls is what we know, not Bring Back Our Corruption! The hash tag Bring Back Our Corruption shows the level of sanity among Nigerians. Being sane means a lot, it is the totality of wellness that may be associated with any person at a given period of time. Not being sane enough to firmly see corruption as a cankerworm is, however, as a result of mental depreciationa condition that is applicable to both illiterate and literate minds. That, again, can inform the level of civility of those championing the cause of Bring Back Our Corruption.

Exchanging ‘Bring Back Our Girls’ for ‘Bring Back Our Corruption’ is the height of stupidity I have seen for a very long time, especially among people that should know better, those who claim they have gone to school. The previous administration, without mincing words, mortgaged the collective wealth of Nigerians on a platter of corruption. And the result of it is what we are grappling with. Corruption brought us to where we are today and some people still want to bring back corruption.

Transformation is what was promised in the previous administration and yes, we were thoroughly transformed by corruption. We really enjoyed the sleaze, isn’t it? Billions of Naira flying out unhindered from government treasury, to the extent that the salaries of workers could not be paid and contracts abandoned due to lack of fund. Is this the kind of government some Nigerians want to have all over again? Why is it so difficult for people to identify with probity as against corruption? It is a shame that we are now accustomed to the life of corruption.

Unknown to the class of youths shouting Bring Back Our Corruption, if the corrupt government that was in power was not booted out, they would suffer more compare to what they are currently suffering. However, as a matter of sincerity, the present economic hardship is really biting hard on everybody. But, should we continue to over-flog and over-exaggerate things beyond normality?

It is on the lips of almost everybody that, “there is no money, the monetary value of commodities is high, dollar rate is high, everything is just difficult. During the time of Jonathan things were not as difficult as it is.” Sure, they are pretty right, but the hardship they are complaining about did not just start now. It was the corrupt government of Jonathan that brought this hardship to them. So why won’t the ‘change mantra’ struggle before finding its feet? This is what Nigerians are finding difficult to understand.

The supposed hardship we are facing under the administration of President Buhari is an act of sabotage. Allowing another reign of corruption will further spell doom for Nigerians. Bring Back Our Corruption is a campaign of hypocrisy and ignorance; we can still Bring Back Our Girls. Nigerians should wake up to the reality that, the hardship they are going through was caused by the massive corruption in the last administration. It will be unwise to embrace another feast of corruption.

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